Influenza Already Killed 64 Children Across The US This Flu Season, The CDC Reported

Influenza Already Killed 64 Children Across The US This Flu Season, The CDC Reported
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According to official data, eight pediatric deaths caused by influenza took place during the week which ended on March 2nd. The number brings the total to 64 deaths that are linked to this year’s flu season, a quite large number.

During the 2015-2016 flu season, 95 children were killed by influenza or complications caused by it. The last death was to the number after information about a case surfaced in January.

The rates of hospitalization due to influenza and pneumonia reached a new milestone in the US during week 8 of the new flu season. The number of people who visited a health care provider to be treated for flu or diseases with similar symptoms decreased a little and reached 4.7% in Massachutes. However, that’s more than double when compared with the national baseline of 2.2 percent which was observed at the end of the ninth week.

This flu season, influenza killed 64 children so far, according to a CDC report

According to the CDC, it is likely that the flu seasons have reached the apex stage during the previous week, but flu activity will continue to remain for the following months. Some states have already reported that the rate of influenza cases has already reached a moderate level during week nine as some indicators continued to grow while others began to fall.

Deaths caused by flu in children were deemed to be nationally notifiable in 2004, with the number varying from one year to another. The smallest amount of deaths took place during the 2011-2012, and it peaked during the last season when 185 deaths were recorded. Some estimations bring the number up to 600 deaths for the previous year.

While flu is an annoyance for healthy adults, it can have lethal consequences for senior citizens and small children, and the risks grow exponentially if the patients are already affected by previous health issues. In some cases, influenza can lead to a weakened immune system, increasing the risk to develop pneumonia and other dangerous complications.


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