If you are older than 29, you might need another measles vaccine

If you are older than 29, you might need another measles vaccine
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Since the measles, a bad disease, was eradicated in 2000 from the U.S., the country is suffering from one of the worst outbreaks of it. However, even though the majority of victims consist in children that were not vaccinated because their parents decided on this, and people who decided they do not need to get vaccinated, there are still people who were affected even though they got the measles vaccine when they were children. Depending on their age, the risk is still there.

Israeli public health officials reported earlier this month that as a result of a measles infection, a 43-year-old Israeli woman had fallen into a deep coma because of a rare complication of the viral, flu-like disease. Outbreaks of measles are frequent in Israel, and they are struggling with this issue, the main reason behind it being the people who are not vaccinated against it, the same case as in the U.S. The woman we mentioned above was a flight attendant so she might have contracted the disease from either country as the company she was working for regularly flies between Israel and the U.S.  However, the degree that she was vaccinated with was not enough.

At the moment of writing, starting at the age of one, children get two doses of the combination mumps, measles, and rubella or MMR. But people in the U.S. and other countries, as recently as the 1980s, were not given two shots. After a series of outbreaks happened in 1989, public health experts in the U.S. decided to endorse a two-dose MMR schedule. Like so many other vaccines, the MMR one is not entirely effective against measles, only 97 percent with the two shots, but in comparison with the 93 percent of effectiveness you would get with only one shot, it is still better.


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