Hubble Space Telescope Unveils Images Of A Triplet Interacting Galaxy

Hubble Space Telescope Unveils Images Of A Triplet Interacting Galaxy
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Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured a striking photo of three galaxies merging, the system known as Arp 195. The image reveals new details about this particular system. Arp 195 is a galaxy that is located approximately 763 million light-years distance from Earth, in the constellation of Lynx. Other names for Arp 195 include LEDA 24981, 2MASX J08535462+3508439 and UGC 04653. It is a system made up of at least three galaxies. Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have teamed to “take a picture” of Arp 195.

According to Hubble astronomers, the system was included in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, an extensive catalog and database of the most unusual galaxies in the universe. The Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies includes an assortment of galaxies, including spirals, colliding galaxies, and peculiar galaxies.

Hubble observations are scheduled using an onboard computer that automatically contacts, images, and logs targets while the telescope performs other observations. Besides observing their targets, Hubble can occasionally capture images of its targets. Based on data obtained through four optical filters, each monochromatic image is assigned a different hue resulting in color.

Hubble Space Telescope is a mission to create the most detailed and high-quality images of the universe using the Wide Field Camera 3 on NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Since its launch in 1990, NASA has released more than 2,000 frames from the 200-mm camera. Image Science & Analysis has been continuously improving Hubble’s quality by removing noise, improving color and enhancing contrast. The resulting images are collected in the Hubble’s most comprehensive collection of Hi-Res Space Telescope Images. The best image received by a telescope is a scientific masterpiece. Though the images are breathtaking, they do contain imperfections caused by the fragile nature of our universe.


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Katherine Baldwin

Katherine is just getting her start as a journalist. She attended a technical school while still in high school where she learned a variety of skills, from photography to nutrition. Her enthusiasm for both natural and human sciences is real so she particularly enjoys covering topics on medicine and the environment.

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