Hubble Space Telescope Images Reveal Gigantic Storm

Hubble Space Telescope Images Reveal Gigantic Storm
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There is a lot of distance between the planets from the Solar System and seen from the Earth, they all seem very little and shiny; it is hard to think that each of those stars might hide secrets like consistency or storms.

Planets have fascinated people for thousands of years and, even if there are billions of miles between the Earth and other places from the Galaxy, scientists have always found ways to study them. Nowadays, researchers from NASA are always trying to find out as much as possible about all the planets from the Solar System and, although they have modern means, their work is getting harder every day.

What’s new in the Solar System

However, one important result of their efforts is the fact that, despite the distance between planets, they have managed to spot a storm on Neptune. The storm is gaining consistency from the material it founds in Neptune’s atmosphere due to the fact that its’ movement is in an anticyclonic direction. Images of this enormous phenomenon capable to hit a big part of our planet have been taken with Hubble Space Telescope.

Since this speculation become a fact, the Hubble has constantly been put to work, so now it shows up with more recent information: it seems that the storm is shrinking in size and losing its’ force. This information is very important because scientists consider every unusual movement from neighboring planets a threat to the Earth.

What will happen next

Now that scientists have noticed that the Neptune storm is decreasing, a question remains: what could happen next? Specialists say that the storm is acting in an unexpected way and that they don’t know what might happen. Anyway, they consider that the storm’s decrease is a good sign. They will continue to monitor the storm’s movement, as well as the movements from other planets.


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