How Did The Megaliths Of Stonehenge Endure For Over 5,000 Years? Geologists Explain

How Did The Megaliths Of Stonehenge Endure For Over 5,000 Years? Geologists Explain
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A new study has revealed some of the secrets behind Stonehenge’s magnificent rocks. The hardiness of the material used to build Stonehenge has been determined through detailed scientific analysis. During the 1950s, when Stone 58 was removed from a sarsen, the piece of core sample was also transported to the United States. After decades in the United States, Stone 58 was returned to Britain for research. The sample was at the core of this current research. The sarsens are huge boulders made of a sedimentary rock that formed slowly, not deep in the earth like most other minerals.

When looking at the internal structure, it was found that sand-sized grains of quartz were grounded together in an interconnected mosaic of crystal pieces. Quartz can withstand a lot of pressure and is tough compared to other minerals, even under harsh conditions. This is what allowed the stone to be durable enough to function in a monument.

“I think Stonehenge has fascinated archaeologists and other scientists for centuries now, partly because we don’t know what it was used for exactly, and there are a number of theories as to why the site was built. It’s a site that is still rich with possibilities for doing more research,” explained geomorphologist David Nash, lead author of the study.

The most famous example of ancient mankind coming together to create something unexpected is Stonehenge. It’s hard to believe that it was just two thousand years ago that man started erecting what is undoubtedly the most recognizable landmark in the entire world. The significance and significance of Stonehenge cannot be understated. It is an ongoing question among scientists as to whether or not there was an actual significance to the earth and its surrounding environment that is still being discovered today.


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Asheley Rice

I am a pop culture and social media expert. Aside from writing about the latest news health, I also enjoy pop culture and Yoga. I have BA in American Cultural Studies and currently enrolled in a Mass-Media MA program. I like to spend my spring breaks volunteering overseas.

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