Dark Matter Experiment Could Lead to the Discovery of New Particles

Dark Matter Experiment Could Lead to the Discovery of New Particles
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Scientists have recently carried out some experiments in the search for cosmic dark matter. It looks like they have now stumbled upon something big, but not gray matter. The researchers that were handling the XENON1T experiment reported some data on June 17, showing a large number of blips located within their sector. Scientists explained that an excess is observed, but there is no clue as to what it is. Evan Shockley, a physicist affiliated with the University of Chicago, talked about the entire result during a virtual seminar.

 He mentioned that the blips could actually be some peculiar type of new particle known as solar axions. Unexpected magnetic properties could be to blame for a number of known particles, known as neutrinos, according to the scientists. The excess could also be caused by a much more mundane situation. A small amount of radioactive tritium could have ended up in the detector. None of the two possibilities mentioned above explain the true nature of dark matter, which is an unseen substance that assists stars in clinging to their galaxies and explaining how structures have formed in the early universe.

The XENON1T detector, which is kept deep underground in Italy, at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, was looking for interactions of dark matter particles within an enormous vessel that is filled with liquid xenon, running from 2016 to 2018. So far, scientists have only come up empty. However, the latest data analysis showed something that they were most certainly not expecting. When they looked for signs of electrons recoiling as the rest of the particles collided with them, the researches noticed that there were additional recoils of electrons at tow energy levels, a much higher level than standard physics predicts. Normal particle interactions should have led to 232 electron recoils at such a low energy level, but researchers noticed 285, so 53 more.


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