Canada Might Be The World’s First Country To Place Warning Labels On Individual Cigarettes

Canada Might Be The World’s First Country To Place Warning Labels On Individual Cigarettes
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According to some recent news, Health Canada might place warning labels on individual cigarettes in its fight against tobacco consumption. If that will indeed become a reality, Canada would be the first world’s country to adopt such a measure in its struggle to reduce smoking.

As the governmental agency reported earlier, tobacco use is the leading but preventable cause of premature death in Canada, being involved in the majority of lung cancer cases across the country.

“Health information on tobacco products is recognized as one of the best approaches to telling people about the health risks of tobacco use. The current labeling requirements for cigarettes and little cigars have been in place since 2011,” stated Health Canada’s representatives.

Accordingly, in May 2018, the Government of Canada announced Canada’s Tobacco Strategy, aiming to make Canadians quit smoking. Also, one of the essential counterattack initiatives in this regard is a new strategy that aims to add more health messages on tobacco packs.

Canada Might Be The World’s First Country To Place Warning Labels On Individual Cigarettes

“Health information on tobacco products is recognized as one of the best approaches to telling people about the health risks of tobacco use. The current labeling requirements for cigarettes and little cigars have been in place since 2011,” Health Canada said, as mentioned above. That approach would be “effective in making the product less appealing to users,” the organization added.

“The cigarette stick is the object of tobacco consumption, which is seen every time a cigarette is smoked. It is also an increasingly important promotional tool for tobacco companies. Our findings suggest that it may be possible to reduce the desirability of cigarette sticks by altering their design, for example, with the addition of a warning or use of an unattractive color,” according to the UK study published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research journal in 2017 on which Health Canada based its ideas.


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