Antibiotics Work Better than Surgery on Appendicitis

Antibiotics Work Better than Surgery on Appendicitis
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In America, there are over 300,000 appendix removal operations performed every year. However, there’s a new study out there which shows how people may want to postpone going under the knife, instead, they could try treating their condition in a safer way by using antibiotics.

More than 250 adults in Finland were analyzed and the resulting data was used for the study we are talking about now. They presented appendicitis – the medical term for when your appendix becomes swollen – and were treated with antibiotics. The data from this group were analyzed by comparison with the data resulting from another group. The second one consisted of 270 adults who had surgery in order to remove their appendix.

The patients from both groups were followed and observed for the next 5 years. The end of the study had nearly two thirds (or 64 percent) of people treated with antibiotics in an excellent state of health. They were considered treated successfully and they didn’t present any sign of another attack of appendicitis.

The remaining 36 percent had to undergo surgery to remove the faulty organ but the good news is that they didn’t suffer any complication resulting from this delay. The study, published in JAMA on the 25th of September, revealed that those treated with antibiotics also presented a lower risk for complications than those that had to go through surgery.

Also, the people in the antibiotics group had to miss 11 fewer days from work, on average, than those in the other group. The study’s lead author, Dr. Paulina Salminen, is a surgeon working at the Turku University Hospital in Finland. When she spoke with CBS News she said, with much delight we are sure, that antibiotics represent a “feasible, viable and a safe option” as opposed to surgery.


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