Lifestyle Changes You Should Make, According To Science

Lifestyle Changes You Should Make, According To Science
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It’s important to understand the nuances of health advice today, especially since many people are still adjusting to the new standard created by the last 18 months of the coronavirus. Focus on developing these habits to lower your risk of chronic disease. Imagine how much better off you would be if you had healthy habits and routines that kept you feeling great.

Too much sugar

Slightly limiting how much sugar you consume each day will keep your blood sugar more stable and it will make it easier for your body’s insulin to get the job done. Experts recommend modest decreases in the amount of added sugar you eat each day, but still encourage a wide variety of foods containing added sugars, including fruit, candy, and processed products.

Not enough sleep

Sleep is a crucial block for the body, responsible for building and repairing tissues, organs and muscles. Studies show that sleep loss is linked to more than just cognitive impairments – poor memory, forgetfulness, inability to concentrate – but physiological changes. Our immune system is weakened during the day, and our body clock is reset at night, making it difficult for us to tackle challenges on the go. When you are sleep deprived, your body releases stress hormones into your bloodstream, which can lead to fatigue and – most importantly — an increased risk of diseases like heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

Chronic stress

Chronic heavy stress is a condition that causes physical and emotional harm. Chronic stress can cut down years of your life if left untreated, according to the American Heart Association. It increases your heart risk factors for heart disease and stroke, lowers your immunity and does not dissipate once it gets started. Recovery from chronic stress can take time and persistence due to detrimental psychological effects caused by the stressor.


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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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