Why is Vitamin D Deficiency Related to Menopause and Osteoporosis?

Why is Vitamin D Deficiency Related to Menopause and Osteoporosis?
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As people age, the body loses its ability to assimilate vitamin D, a process that contributes to calcium ablation. This becomes a major risk factor for osteoporosis, especially during the post-menopausal period.

How is osteoporosis related to menopause?

There is a direct relationship between the lack of estrogen during perimenopause and menopause and the occurrence of osteoporosis. Early menopause, as well as prolonged menstrual periods in which hormone levels are low and menstrual periods, are absent or rare, can lead to bone loss.

A very important role of estrogen is in the bone system. Long-term menopausal symptoms include osteoporosis. By the time of osteoporosis, bone demineralization has a slow rate of osteopenia. These conditions are manifested by bone pain, a sign that the process of bone demineralization has begun.

To slow down this process, specialists recommend intake of vitamins and minerals, especially calcium with vitamin D3 support, magnesium and zinc. It would be best to take a 25-hydroxyvitamin D test, to see if you have Vitamin D deficiency. The normal levels of Vitamin D can vary depending mostly on age.

How is Vitamin D helping?

We still can’t say exactly how much hormones influence the conversion of vitamin D, but women appear to have difficulty in stimulating the mechanism that helps strengthen bone tissue when estrogen levels are low.

According to the studies, a diet rich in calcium and a high level of vitamin D contributes to the control of specific post-menopausal symptoms, anxiety, irritability and stress. The phenomenon cannot be explained clearly, but it is related to the fact that the systems of the human body are interconnected.


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