Smoking Pot Might Increase Depression Risks, Rising Suicide Behavior in Teens

Smoking Pot Might Increase Depression Risks, Rising Suicide Behavior in Teens
SHARE

According to recent research, smoking pot during adolescence might increase depression risks, possibly rising suicide behavior in teens. The researchers from McGill University carried out this study by meta-analyzing the results of 11 international longitudinal studies conducted on young adult aged between 18 and 32 who consumed marijuana, regularly.

The recent research revealed that those subjects who smoke weed during adolescence presented higher risks of depression, as well as raised suicidal behavior and attempts rates, in comparison with those who did not use marijuana frequently.

“We have to do more prevention, to decrease the number of young people and adolescents that smoke cannabis,” said Gabriella Gobbi, a McGill psychiatry professor. Since we had legalization, young people continue to smoke as before. So legalization is not the only response. We need to do more prevention,” Gobbi added.

Smoking Pot Might Increase Depression Risks, Rising Suicide Behavior in Teens

According to the researchers, this new study is also proof that daily or weekly marijuana consumption is not as harmless as smokers believe. In reality, smoking pot is affecting the brain, and the teens are most affected by the THC side effects on the mood since their brains develop entirely only around the age of 25.

“THC is a lipid, so it stays in the brain and in the body for one week or even more – in some individuals until one month. So smoking a joint is not like drinking two or three beers on a Saturday night,” Gobbi added. “Now we have joints that have 10, 20, 30 percent, even more content of THC, so we don’t know the impact of the cannabis that we have today on mental health. This is something that of course we have to study more,” she continued.

“Among young adults worldwide, depression is the leading cause of disability, and suicide is the most common cause of death,” also said Joseph Firth from Australia’s Western Sydney University.


SHARE

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.