Physical Exercises Proved Beneficial In Slowing Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

Physical Exercises Proved Beneficial In Slowing Alzheimer’s Disease Progression
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The hormone irisin, which the body secretes in more significant amounts during physical exercise, may prevent dementia, according to a recent study. More specifically, a new study revealed that irisin prevents Alzheimer’s-related memory loss, according to the research published earlier in the journal Nature Medicine.

When we do physical exercises, muscle tissue releases the hormone irisin, which then enters into the circulatory system in the body and is capable of improving cognitive capacity. At least, that’s the conclusion of new research conducted by scientists from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil, and Columbia University, in the United States. The study was conducted in lab mice with this dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment.

The scientists responsible for the study, Ottavio Arancio, Sergio Ferreira, and Fernanda de Felice, demonstrated that a boost the hormone irisin, as well as its precursor protein, the so-called FNDC5, reduced memory and learning deficits in rodents with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, as well.

Physical Exercises Proved Beneficial In Slowing Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

The researchers also observed that when they blocked the secretion of this substance in the sick mice’s brains, the beneficial cognitive effects of physical exercises diminished.

The scientists also noted that while physical exercises are well-known to improve cognitive abilities and slow the progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, additional studies are needed to understand better how the hormone irisin enters into action and interacts with the brain.

In addition to that, the researchers also indicated that more knowledge is needed to assess whether the protein FNDC5 has a similar beneficial cognitive effect in humans. However, they stressed that the recent finding might pave the way for new therapeutic strategies to mitigate cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, a condition for which there is no cure, at the moment.


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