Physical Exercise Can Keep Type 2 Diabetes At Bay

Physical Exercise Can Keep Type 2 Diabetes At Bay
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Type 2 diabetes, so-called non-insulin-dependent diabetes or adult-onset diabetes, is characterized by the fact that the pancreas continues to produce insulin, even though the body develops resistance to the effects of insulin. In short, type 2 diabetes is an “insulin deficiency.” However, those people prone to type 2 diabetes can avoid getting sick. So, physical exercise can keep type 2 diabetes at bay by holding the blood sugar levels within a healthy range.

Type 2 diabetes can occur in children and adolescents, but usually begins in people over the age of 30 and is becoming more common in older age groups. Approximately 15% of people over the age of 70 have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has family aggregation, and its primary risk factor is obesity, as 80-90% of people with this disease are overweight. Because obesity produces insulin resistance, the affected persons require very high amounts of insulin to maintain normal blood glucose levels.

Physical Exercise Can Keep Type 2 Diabetes At Bay

In a recent study carried out by the scientists at the Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, the researchers revealed that HIIT physical exercise can reduce the risks of type 2 diabetes, as it keeps the blood sugar levels within a healthy range.

“The short bursts of exercises of “High-Intensity Training (HIIT) make it easy to fit a workout into a busy week, but its benefits don’t stop there. It’s also one of the fastest ways to increase strength and stamina while building lean body mass and burning fat,” explained Trainer Zana Morris.

“In fact, a study by researchers at McMaster University in Canada found that three 20-minute sessions of intense interval training per week (working at 85 percent of your maximum heart rate) can provide the same benefits as ten hours of steady exercise over a two-week period. High-intensity workouts cause massive disturbances in your muscle fibers, and this increases your metabolic rate for anything from two to 24 hours after you work out. That means your body continues burning a bit more fat even when you rest,” Zana Morris concluded.


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