Increased Alcohol-Related Deaths Rates Across The US, Due To Higher Alcohol Consumption Among Younger American Generations

Increased Alcohol-Related Deaths Rates Across The US, Due To Higher Alcohol Consumption Among Younger American Generations
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A new research report released in the British Medical Journal on Wednesday showed that liver disease-related fatalities among US citizens aged 25 to 34 have risen over the last ten years. Alcohol is thought to be the primary cause of this rise, as reported by the NBC News.

Higher alcohol-related deaths recorded in Kentucky, New Mexico, and Arkansas

The cirrhosis, the late scarring of the liver resulting from liver disease related to chronic alcoholism, among others, rose 65 percent from 1999 to 2016, the study reported.

Researchers have also found that white Americans, Native Americans and Hispanic Americans had the most significant rise in deaths caused by cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, a liver cancer linked to cirrhosis and, subsequently, to alcohol consumption. Death rates were higher in Kentucky, New Mexico, and Arkansas, but lower in Maryland.

Younger American generations are consuming more alcohol, leading to increased alcohol-related diseases

The leading study’s author and the assistant professor of liver research at the University of Michigan, Elliot Tapper, pointed out that “alcohol abuse and its complications” are impacting a younger American generation. People who drink several drinks a night or who drink heavily on several nights a week are at high risk for life-threatening cirrhosis, Tapper noted in the study’s report.

However, Tapper also pointed out that there is “an excellent chance that your liver will repair itself” if you have an alcohol-related disease, but you quit drinking.

As noted by the study, the younger American generations are consuming more and more alcohol, a trending that causes higher rates of binge drink-related diseases and alcohol-related deaths.

Cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are fatal conditions but preventable

Leaving increased footprints across the USA, both cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are lethal diseases. In the case of cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma, death is just the end of a very harsh journey characterized by disabilities and caregiver burden, as the study’s report pointed out.

Both cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are alcohol-related diseases, so they are both preventable.


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