Gut Bacteria in Newborn Babies Has A Crucial Role In Fighting Diseases

Gut Bacteria in Newborn Babies Has A Crucial Role In Fighting Diseases
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Scientists have already revealed that the intestinal flora is an excellent ally against several diseases. Now, a new study showed that the first gut bacteria that form in newborn babies has a crucial role in fighting early-life diseases, paving the way to new findings in this field that would allow researchers to develop mechanisms to balance the microbiome.

Ecologist Jens Walter from the University of Alberta, in Canada, and his co-workers revealed that the makeup of the human intestinal bacterial populations depends on how fast we receive the first gut bacteria. Therefore, the gut bacteria in newborn babies is essential for helping them fight diseases during the first months of life.

The recent findings reveal that each individual’s microbiome, which is as unique as fingerprints, are the key to “figuring out how to change our microbiomes for the better,” as Jens Walter said.

Gut Bacteria in Newborn Babies Has A Crucial Role In Fighting Diseases

“Each of us harbors a microbiome that is vastly distinct, even for identical twins. Microbiomes are important for our health, but they appear to be shaped by many unknown factors, so it’s hugely important to understand why we are all different,” explained Jens Walters.

The researchers pointed out that poor gut bacteria increase the risks of obesity, type-2 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular conditions, allergies, and autism, among others.

If we know what drives specific microbiomes in specific people, we can have a much more rational approach to potentially altering the microbiome, and developing strategies to address those diseases,” Walter said. “Having long-term persistence of microbes when they colonize in the gut early in life means that a health-promoting biome could potentially be established by introducing beneficial bacteria straight after birth,” he added.

“We could be a lot more systematic. I think in 30 or 40 years we’ll be able to colonize infants with specific bacteria we know are health promoting and shape the microbiome in a beneficial way,” the researcher concluded.


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