European Union Won’t Authorize Omega-3 Drugs To Prevent Heart Attack

European Union Won’t Authorize Omega-3 Drugs To Prevent Heart Attack
SHARE

Omega-3 drugs, based on the popular fatty acids, are not helpful in the prevention of heart and vascular disorders in patients who have experienced a heart attack, concluded a review of cumulative data gathered over the years by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The health officials stated that the European Union would not authorize omega-3-based medications to prevent a second heart attack.

European Union Won’t Authorize Omega-3 Drugs To Prevent Heart Attack

The revision was initiated last March at the suggestion of the Swedish Medicines Agency. As the EMA reports, the advice of the CHMP would now be forwarded to the European Commission, which would then deliver a legally enforceable final ruling that would apply across all Member States of the European Union.

These omega-3 drugs include the fatty acids Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic (DHA), which are most often encountered in fish oils. They are administered orally and have been allowed in a number of EU countries since 2000 to help patients prevent heart disease or stroke after a heart attack (in combination with other medicines) and to decrease some types of blood fats like triglycerides. The European Union will continue to permit omega-3-based supplement for reducing the harmful fats in the blood.

Recent Studies Showed That Omega-3 Medications Are Not As Beneficial As Thought In Preventing Heart Attack

Back in 2000, the existing data demonstrated some beneficial effects of omega-3 drugs in the reduction of acute heart and vascular disorders, even though these were deemed modest and had not been substantiated ever since. But now, recalls the EMA committee, while there are no new safety concerns, the balance between the beneficial and harmful effects of these omega-3 drugs to prevent the recurrence of heart attacks is not as clear as scientists have thought initially.


SHARE

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.