Clinical Trial for New Covid-19 Booster Jab Efficient Against Multiple Strains

Clinical Trial for New Covid-19 Booster Jab Efficient Against Multiple Strains
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A new Covid-19 vaccine, GRT-R910, uses a new mRNA technology known as self-amplifying, which could provide efficient protection against the many strains of the Covid-19 virus. A clinical trial will start soon, and the results might be ready at the beginning of next year. The pharmaceutical company behind the vaccine, Gritstone, released a statement in which the GRT-R910 vaccine has been described as the best way to boost the immune system after receiving other Covid-19 vaccines in the past.

More about the early trial of the booster vaccine

Phase one of the trial will begin in Manchester, as Gritstone will collaborate with the University of Manchester and Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust (MFT). The trial will involve research subjects who are 60 years old or older, and the MFT Research and Innovation Vaccine Team will administer the doses. Two subjects have already received their booster jab: Andrew and Helen Clarke from Bolton. Twenty more volunteers will be recruited.

SAM vaccines are expected to offer durable and robust immune response against Covid-19 variant

The new generation of mRNA second-generation Sars-CoV-2 vaccines (SAM) is expected to trigger a strong and durable immune response against the multiple variants of the new coronavirus. Its creators also expect that the SMA vaccines will be administered in lower doses, and there will be no need for repeated administrations.

Possible implications for future outbreaks

If the SMA vaccine proves it is efficient and safe to use on humans, then the technology behind it might be used against other viruses, thus ending possible outbreaks sooner. Future trials will use other vulnerable populations. The vaccine triggers the CD8+ T cells, responsible for activating the body’s immune system, and it inaduces antibodies to fight off the viral infection. Thus, the virus will not be able to multiply and infect other cells.


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Jeffrey Olmsted

Jeffrey likes to write about health and fitness topics, being a champion fitness instructor in the past.

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