Cancer Breakthrough: Transplanting Disease-Fighting Immune Cells Could Save Millions Of Lives

Cancer Breakthrough: Transplanting Disease-Fighting Immune Cells Could Save Millions Of Lives
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Scientists believe that they are now onto something big regarding cancer treatment. In a new cancer breakthrough, a team of researchers from the Francis Crick Institute in London, in the United Kingdom, developed a method to transplant disease-fighting immune cells from strangers to cancer patients. The new approach could save millions of lives around the world by strengthening the patients’ own immune system without boasting the same side effect of the standard cancer treatments such as chemotherapy.

The new approach, even though it’s in its early stages still, it is very promising and could indeed save the lives of the millions of cancer patients around the world.

“We’re not quite there yet. But that’s what we’re trying now. There is every capability of getting cell banks like this established,” explained Professor Adrian Hayday, the team leader of the Immunosurveillance Lab at The Crick.

Cancer Breakthrough: Transplanting Disease-Fighting Immune Cells Could Save Millions Of Lives

Adrian Hayday also said that the theory behind the new approach is not new since oncologists already knew for some years that cancer could be indeed beaten by not attacking the disease itself but enhancing the immune response to force the organism to identify cancer cells and kill them naturally.

Now, however, thanks to the many scientific advancements in the fields of medicine and technology, the researchers have improved their approaches and eventually came up with new methods to boost the immune system in cancer patients to help them fight this disease better than ever.

In the new study, the scientists noticed that transplanting disease-fighting immune cells to cancer patients might indeed help their immune system fight against tumors and eliminate cancer cells better than any other traditional cancer therapy, including other immunotherapies.

“The future is incredibly bright. Using the body’s own immune cells to target the tumor is elegant because tumors evolve so quickly there is no way a pharmaceutical company can keep up with it. But the immune system has been evolving for over four billion years to do just that,” concluded Professor Charlie Swanton from Crick’s Cancer Evolution and Genome Instability Laboratory.


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