Breast Cancer Survival Rates Extended With Two New Drug Combinations

Breast Cancer Survival Rates Extended With Two New Drug Combinations
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Two new studies showed that breast cancer survival rates could be extended with two new drug combinations. More specifically, combining palbociclib drugs with hormone therapy can considerably boost the survival of women affected by advanced breast cancer.

The first study, called “Overall Survival with Palbociclib and Fulvestrant in Advanced Breast Cancer,” carried out by the Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, revealed that women with advanced breast cancer managed to live longer than others thanks to a combination of palbociclib medications with hormone therapy.

“These results indicate that we can now offer women with incurable breast cancer some precious extra survival time before their condition worsens. It is very encouraging,” stated the study’s leading author, Professor Nick Turner of the Institute of Cancer Research.

This first study was conducted with the participation of 521 women suffering from advanced and hormone-sensitive breast cancer. According to the researchers, the combination of palbociclib drugs and hormone therapy extended the survival rates of advanced breast cancer with about 35 months.

Breast Cancer Survival Rates Extended With Two New Drug Combinations

A second study, titled “Atezolizumab and Nab-Paclitaxel in Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer,” conducted by St Bartholomew’s Hospital and Queen Mary University of London researchers, also revealed that drug combinations are improving the survival rates in women with breast cancer.

According to the researchers, the combination of chemotherapy, atezolizumab, with immunotherapy, nab-paclitaxel, is extending breast cancer survival rate with about 13 months, on average.

According to Professor Peter Schmid, this study is “a massive step forward and might lead to a cure in some patients and may apply in the treatment of other forms of breast cancers in the future.”

This study was carried out on 451 women with triple-negative breast cancer.

“Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer. It is particularly tragic that those affected are often young. I’m thrilled that by using a combination of immunotherapy and chemotherapy we are able to significantly extend lives compared to the standard treatment of chemotherapy alone,” explained Professor Schmid.


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