Alzheimer’s Disease Can Now Be Detected in Early Stages

Alzheimer’s Disease Can Now Be Detected in Early Stages
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A team of researchers led by Professor and Doctor Klaus Gerwert from Ruhr University in Germany have created a new two-level technique that can identify Alzheimer’s disease at an earlier phase for the today’s approach can only detect the disease at later stages. The study was issued in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment, and Disease Monitoring​.

Long before the first manifestations of the disease appear, the amyloid beta protein already plies improperly in Alzheimer patients because of the pathological shifts. The research team efficiently discovered this misfolding by utilizing a plain blood test – the outcome was that Alzheimer’s disease could be found about eight years before the first manifestations appear.

Alzheimer’s Disease Can Now Be Detected in Early Stages

The test was not appropriate for clinical operations, but it discovered 71 percent of Alzheimer’s situations in asymptomatic​ phases but also gave false positive interpretations for 9 percent of the participants. To rise up the number of correct diagnosed cases, and to decrease the amount of the incorrect ones, the team improved the test, introducing a two-level diagnostic approach.

They utilize the initial blood test and then add a dementia-precise biomarker, a so-called tau protein, to further check with those people who got a definite diagnosis in the first phase. If both test levels give a particular conclusion, there is an excellent possibility of Alzheimer’s disease. By combining the two stages, 87 out of 100 Alzheimer’s cases were detected correctly, and the number of false affirmative identifications was decreased to 3 out of 100. The second stage of analysis is completed in cerebrospinal fluid that is extorted from the spinal cord.

Gerwert said that clinical experiments can now be made, as the blood test has been enhanced to a totally automatic technique. The study was issued in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment, and Disease Monitoring​.


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