Vitamin D: What Are The Most Important Perks of This Important Vitamin?

Vitamin D: What Are The Most Important Perks of This Important Vitamin?
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The most important vitamin D benefits are related to bone health and calcium absorption. In fact, vitamin D is actually a hormone that the body produces in response to sunlight through the skin, and it’s necessary for the proper absorption of calcium.

In addition to its role in helping your body absorb calcium and phosphate, which are essential for building healthy bones, having optimal blood levels of vitamin D may also help protect against a range of conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and heart disease.

One of the main benefits of vitamin D is that it helps regulate blood levels of calcium, which is vital for keeping your bones healthy. Adequate levels of vitamin D are also required for proper functioning of the immune system and neuromuscular system.

What Are the Other Benefits of Vitamin D?

Vitamin D has been linked to a number of other potential health benefits, including:

  • Reduced risk of cancer: Studies suggest that people who get enough vitamin D in their diet may reduce their risk for developing certain cancers.
  • Stronger immunity: Vitamin D plays a key role in immunity and can help your body fight off many different kinds of infections.
  • Lower blood pressure: Getting enough vitamin D could lower high blood pressure by reducing inflammation.
  • Vitamin D is often called the sunshine vitamin because it is produced by the skin in response to sunlight. Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones and muscles, as it helps the body absorb calcium (1Trusted Source).
  • In fact, your body produces vitamin D on its own when your skin is exposed to sunlight. That’s why most people meet at least some of their vitamin D needs through exposure to sunlight.
  • The main role of vitamin D is to maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. It does so by helping you absorb calcium from your diet. Calcium and phosphorus are needed to build and maintain strong bones.

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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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