Pomegranate Generates a Compound That Might Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Pomegranate Generates a Compound That Might Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease
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Pomegranate might help people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) relief from symptoms of the conditions. All that, thanks to a compound pomegranate contains. More specifically, natural polyphenols found in this fruit interact with gut bacteria, generating a substance that fights inflammation. The researchers from the University of Louisville in Kentucky discovered the beneficial effects of pomegranate in treating IBD.

Across the US, about 1.6 million people are suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, the American scientists’ discovery is of great importance in dealing with IBD across the States, and worldwide, after all.

Polyphenols are common compounds found in berries such as pomegranate, blackberries, raspberries, and strawberries. But the pomegranate’s ellagic acid interacts with a gut bacterium, the INIA P815 strain of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, generating a compound known as UroA.

UroA has anti-inflammatory effects and anti-aging benefits, according to Dr. Venkatakrishna Rao Jala, the study’s leading author.

Pomegranate Generates a Compound That Might Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

As pomegranate interacts with gut bacteria and produce UroA, and anti-inflammatory compound, pomegranate consumption might be helpful in treating inflammatory bowel disease or at least lower the condition’s symptoms.

“The general belief thus far in the field is that urolithins, such as UroA and UAS03, exert beneficial effects through their anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative properties,” explained Dr. Rajbir Singh, one of the study’s authors.

“We have for the first time discovered that their mode of function also includes repairing the gut barrier dysfunction and maintaining barrier integrity,” the researcher continued.

“Microbes in our gut have evolved to generate beneficial microbial metabolites in the vicinity of the gut barrier. However, this requires that we protect and harbor the appropriate gut microbiota and consume a healthy diet. This study shows that direct consumption of UroA or its analog can compensate for lack of the specific bacteria responsible for the production of UroA and continuous consumption of pomegranates and berries,” concluded Dr. Rao Jala.


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