Egg Consumption Will Not Increase the Stroke Risk, a New Study Concluded

Egg Consumption Will Not Increase the Stroke Risk, a New Study Concluded
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A new study elaborated by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland argues that a reasonable intake of cholesterol or the consumption of an egg each day cannot be linked to increased stroke risk.

Previous studies failed to provide conclusive data about the possible connections between dietary cholesterol levels, the consumption of eggs, and stroke-related risks. While some claim to have uncovered a link between a diet rich in cholesterol and significant stroke risk, other studies argue that the consumption of eggs can mitigate the same risk.

Many nutritionists claim that low cholesterol diets are a useful tool in the attempt to minimize and prevent select health afflictions, among which we can also count stroke. Some dieters attempt to lower their cholesterol levels by removing eggs from their diet (in some cases only the egg yolk is removed).

Egg consumption is not boosting stroke risk

In most cases, the daily amount of cholesterol intake doesn’t tend to affect serum cholesterol levels. Those who carry the apolipoprotein E phenotype 4, which exerts a significant influence on how cholesterol is metabolized, are more sensitive to how the intake of cholesterol can influence the amount of cholesterol serum found in the body.

In Finland, a large part of the population carries APOE4, as it is present in up to 30% of the population. Despite this fact, the amount of scientific data on the link between a diet rich in cholesterol and stroke risks has been quite scarce until now.

The researchers observed the dietary habits of 1,950 men over an extended period of types. It is believed that a reasonable cholesterol intake or the consumption of an egg per day doesn’t seem to be associated with higher stroke risk, even in the case of a person who is more vulnerable to the effects of the cholesterol intake on their metabolism. The results of the study were published in a medical journal.


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