Drinking Hot Tea Might Boost Esophageal Cancer Risks

Drinking Hot Tea Might Boost Esophageal Cancer Risks
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In a recent study, researchers found out that the incidence of esophageal cancer is higher in people who like drinking hot tea. According to the research, drinking beverages hotter than 60 degrees Celsius is boosting the cancer risks by as much as 90 percent.

For their study, the scientists analyzed the data from more than 50,000 people aged between 40 and 75 who live in the province of Golestan in northeastern Iran, one of the regions of the world where the habit of drinking hot tea is quite widespread.

Out of those 50,000 people, followed for over ten years during the study, 300 developed esophageal cancer. The scientists observed that the only thing those people had in common was drinking hot tea.

“Many people enjoy drinking tea, coffee or other hot beverages. However, according to our report, drinking very hot tea can increase the risk of esophageal cancer, and it is, therefore, advisable to wait until hot beverages cool down before drinking,” explained the study’s leading author, Farhad Islami, from the American Cancer Society.

Drinking Hot Tea Might Boost Esophageal Cancer Risks

The study was issued in the International Journal of Cancer, and it confirms the findings of previous studies that also concluded that there is a connection between drinking extremely hot beverages and esophageal cancer risks.

Now, the researchers plan to conduct even more studies to establish why drinking hot tea is really boosting the risks of esophageal cancer development.

According to previous researches in this regard, risk factors for esophageal cancer include smoking, drinking alcohol, and acid reflux, all of which are repeatedly damaging the esophageal lining. Now, it seems that hot beverages are also among the culprits for esophageal cancer.

“In fact, it is probably anything hot: microwaved jam has been known to cause esophageal injury. It is possible that the trauma leads to cell changes and hence to cancer,” also said Stephen Evans, a professor of pharmacoepidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.


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