Consider Adding These Japanese Foods To Your Diet To Boost Your Health

Consider Adding These Japanese Foods To Your Diet To Boost Your Health
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The Japanese diet has been the subject of many studies and articles, and for good reason. This country has one of the highest life expectancies in the world, as well as a low rate of obesity and heart disease. The combination of a healthy diet and regular exercise has led to an overall lower risk of disease for Japanese people compared to their counterparts around the world.

While there are many foods that contribute to this healthy lifestyle, there are certain ones that stand out as being particularly nutritious. If you’re looking for ways to improve your diet, consider adding these fiveJapanese foods to your routine:

Sushi

While sushi may seem like nothing more than raw fish covered in rice and seaweed, it often contains other healthy ingredients like avocado or cucumber. Sashimi is another type of sushi that consists of thinly sliced raw fish without the rice or seaweed wrapper. Both types are low in calories and contain omega-3 fatty acids which can help prevent heart disease and stroke by lowering bad cholesterol levels while raising good cholesterol levels in your body.

Miso Soup

Miso soup is a traditional Japanese soup made from fermented soybeans and served. It’s high in protein, fiber and antioxidants — all things that help lower cholesterol levels and keep your heart healthy. with tofu, seaweed and green onions.

Natto

This fermented soybean dish has a strong smell and flavor but is actually very nutritious. It’s high in iron and can help prevent cancer.

Soy sauce

Japanese soy sauce is made from fermented wheat and salt, so it’s low on the glycemic index and contains antioxidants.

Sashimi

Raw fish served without any seasonings or sauces provides many essential nutrients like vitamin B12, selenium and omega-3 fatty acids that are normally missing from most Western diets due to overconsumption of processed foods with added sugars and fats. Sashimi should always be eaten fresh.

 


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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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