Scientists Discovers Gene Which Enhances Muscular Strength When Activated By Exercise

Scientists Discovers Gene Which Enhances Muscular Strength When Activated By Exercise
SHARE

A gene that, when triggered by physical exercise, results in increased muscular strength was discovered by researchers in a study that was conducted not too long ago. This may pave the way for the development of therapeutic treatments that replicate some of the benefits that are gained through physical activity. The results of the study were written up and presented in the academic publication known as “Cell Metabolism.”

The research demonstrated how various forms of physical activity alter the chemicals that are found in our muscles. This led to the identification of a novel gene called C18ORF25, which is activated by all forms of physical activity and is responsible for increasing muscular strength. Animals without C18ORF25 are unable to function as well in physical activity and have muscles that are less robust. The activation of the C18ORF25 gene, as explained by the project’s principal researcher, Dr. Benjamin Parker, showed the study team that muscles might become much more powerful without necessarily growing in size.
In the research, which was a cooperation between Dr. Parker and Professors Erik Richter and Bente Kiens of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, the team was able to uncover the molecular commonalities and differences between various forms of exercising in human muscle biopsies by examining proteins and how they change inside cells. This was accomplished via the use of human muscle samples.
The experimental design made it possible for the researchers to examine the signaling responses elicited by the various types of exercise in the same person in relation to their degree of fitness before they began exercising. This meant that scientists were able to see, directly in the muscles of an individual, how that person reacted to various forms of physical activity. Importantly, it enabled the research team to uncover genes and proteins that alter in a constant manner across all people and all forms of exercise, which led to the identification of a new gene.


SHARE
Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.