What Does COVID-19 Do To Humans In The Long Term? Scientists Reveals

What Does COVID-19 Do To Humans In The Long Term? Scientists Reveals
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In a sign of continuing difficulties in containing the virus, upward pressure on hospitals has been consistent in the past three months. Now, there are even more reasons to worry about the pandemic. A recent study revealed that the effects of the virus could be long-lasting. The study shows that regardless of recovery from COVID, sometimes the symptoms still persist.

Among the 47,910 individuals involved in the research, over 50 long-term consequences of COVID-19 were discovered. One of the most frequent of these lasting effects, which range from moderate to devastating and continue up to months following full recovery, is tiredness (58%), accompanied by headaches (44%), concentration problem (27%), loss of hair (25%), breathlessness (24%), and finally loss of taste (23%).

The researchers discovered 55 persisting symptoms, signs, and aberrant laboratory findings, with the majority of the lasting effects resembling the manifestations shown throughout the acute stage of COVID-19. The scientists claim their analysis indicates the impact of Extended COVID is considerable and emphasizes the need to detect these chronic issues.

Source: Pixabay
Source: Pixabay

In a series of studies, data from patients recovering from mild, moderate, and severe cases of COVID-19 were collected to show the effectiveness and safety of the drugs and placebo. These data were drawn from self-reported patient surveys, medical records, and clinical evaluations. Patients hospitalized for COVID-19 made up 40% of the data set, with the rest drawn from a mix of mild, moderate, and severe cases.

The researchers conducted a comprehensive examination and meta-analysis of those same publications to determine the frequency of all the COVID-19 symptoms, indicators, and unusual laboratory values that lasted further than the severe stage. They assessed numerous biomarkers, such as abnormal chest X-rays or CT scans, the likelihood of blood clots, the existence of inflammation, and indications of potential heart collapse.


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Asheley Rice

I am a pop culture and social media expert. Aside from writing about the latest news health, I also enjoy pop culture and Yoga. I have BA in American Cultural Studies and currently enrolled in a Mass-Media MA program. I like to spend my spring breaks volunteering overseas.

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