Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis In Young Patients May Lead To Increased Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality

Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis In Young Patients May Lead To Increased Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality
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It is a well-known fact that patients with diabetes have a risk of developing cardiovascular disease 2 to 4 times higher than the risks observed in the general population of similar age and sex. In this sense, cardiovascular complications attributable to arteriosclerosis are responsible for 75% of all causes of death in subjects with diabetes and represent more than 75% of total hospitalizations for diabetic complications. A new study also revealed that type 2 diabetes diagnosis in younger patients increases the mortality of cardiovascular disease related to type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes-related cardiovascular diseases

The arteriosclerosis lesions in diabetic patients are developing earlier and faster than in patients without diabetes.

Diabetes-related arteriosclerosis is generalized and severe, characterized by unstable plaques, and it affects both men and women, in equal measure.

The main clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis are ischemic heart disease, stroke, arteriosclerosis obliterans of the lower extremities.

Current clinical practice support that diabetes, in general, should be considered a situation of high cardiovascular risk. In special, the type 2 diabetes is the most dangerous risk factor of cardiovascular diseases death.

Diabetes diagnosis in younger patients increases the mortality of cardiovascular disease

Australian researchers of Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne gathered and analyzed data of 743,709 Australians with type 2 diabetes. During the study period, 115,363 were registered among the participants.

Professors Dianna Magliano and Jonathan Shaw, study’s authors, explained that they found significant differences between some of the deaths cases. The researchers continued to study further and noticed that a pattern exists.

More specifically, Magliano and Shaw discovered that people who were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at younger ages presented cardiovascular mortality risk by 60% higher than the type 2 diabetes patients with the same age but which were diagnosed late.

“An earlier diagnosis of type 2 diabetes – and thus a longer duration of disease – was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality, primarily driven by CVD (cardiovascular diseases) mortality,” said the study’s authors. A possible solution to this would be clinical assistance and new drugs.


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