Too Much Lithium in Tap Water Could Make People Prone to Autism

Too Much Lithium in Tap Water Could Make People Prone to Autism
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Tap water can be safe for drinking in many countries, but this can vary depending on where you live. In general, tap water in developed countries undergoes treatment processes to remove harmful contaminants such as bacteria, viruses, and chemicals, making it safe to drink.

A new study published in JAMA Pediatrics has identified a possible environmental risk factor for autism spectrum disorder. The study found that pregnant women whose household tap water had higher levels of naturally occurring lithium had a higher risk of their offspring being diagnosed with autism, as NeuroscienceNews.com reveals.

The study, which was conducted in Denmark, used address information from the country’s comprehensive civil registry system to determine which waterworks supplied mothers’ homes at the time of their pregnancy. The researchers controlled for several factors, including air pollution exposure, maternal characteristics, and socioeconomic factors.

Beate Ritz, the lead study author, stated as the same source mentioned above quotes:

Any drinking water contaminants that may affect the developing human brain deserve intense scrutiny,

In the future, anthropogenic sources of lithium in water may become more widespread because of lithium battery use and disposal in landfills with the potential for groundwater contamination.

The results of our study are based on high-quality Danish data but need to be replicated in other populations and areas of the world.

Autism is not inherently dangerous. It is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects social communication and behavior, but it is not a physical illness or disease that poses a threat to an individual’s health or safety. However, some individuals with autism may experience challenges in certain areas of their lives that could potentially be dangerous, such as difficulty understanding social cues, communication barriers, sensory issues, and repetitive behaviors.

It is important to understand and support individuals with autism and provide them with resources and accommodations to ensure their safety and well-being.


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Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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