Things You Need to Know About Human Plagues and How to Avoid Them

Things You Need to Know About Human Plagues and How to Avoid Them
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The Human Plague strikes again the Santa Fe community. Two new cases have been confirmed (52 and 62 years old females). The first case reported in New Mexico was in early June. The three victims infected with the plague are under supervision and required hospitalization.

A brief history of the plague

The first plague to have been recorded by historians was in 541 A.D in central Africa. This plague spread all the way to Egypt and the Mediterranean region.

A second major plague (major plagues are called pandemics) took place in China, in 1334 and managed its way all through Europe, decimating 60% of the population of that time.

The third pandemic was in 1860s and it was named the Modern Plague. The plague began in China and spread into the rest of the world because of rats.

A plague starts with the death of rodents and after flees get infected, the spread is imminent. In the United States, outbreaks occur in southwestern states such as Arizona, California, New Mexico. There is an average of 15 cases per year.

Transmission and symptoms

Humans get infested after getting bitten by an infected rodent flea. Another method would be by skinning wild animals such as squirrels, prairie dogs, rats or rabbits. If one of the animals getting skinned is infected with the bacteria, then during the handling process, the human can get infected. A third method known is by inhaling droplets from the cough of infected humans or animals (mostly cats).

Plagues known to affect humans nowadays include the bubonic plague, the septicemic plague and the pneumonic one. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain, coughs, fever, fatigue, vomiting, bleeding through the mouth, muscle ache.

Prevention

Scientists advise the population and its domestic animals to avoid touching and playing with dead animals. Also pets should not sleep in the same bed with their humans. Keep an eye for rodents and handle dead or sick animals using gloves and protecting your face.


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