The FDA Approves New Type Of Condom That Could Reduce STI Transmission

The FDA Approves New Type Of Condom That Could Reduce STI Transmission
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The Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of the world’s first condom that is particularly developed for anal intercourse. The One Male Condom, as it is now marketed, can be used for both anal and vaginal intercourse, but it is anticipated that this approval would encourage more people to wear condoms during anal sex, which is associated with a greater risk of transmitting certain sexually transmitted viruses such as HIV.

The One Male Condom was put through its paces in a scientific experiment with little more than 500 participants, divided equally into two groups: gay couples and heterosexual couples. The failing incidence of the condom, which is classified as the condom falling off or tearing during sex, was determined to be 0.68 percent during anal intercourse and 1.92 percent during vaginal sex, according to the findings. There were no significant adverse effects recorded, albeit fewer than 1% of participants reported having an STI or having recently been diagnosed with an STI over the course of the experiment. Despite the possibility that some of these infections were caused by the infrequent chance of condom failure, it is probable that some instances happened prior to the study or may have happened when condoms were missing.

In order to prevent the transmission of sexually transmitted illnesses, condoms and other similar barrier techniques have long been suggested for all types of sexual contact, including anal, including anal. According to the FDA, any FDA-approved condom, this one included, may still be utilized to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and pregnancies from vaginal intercourse. Although the government acknowledged that approving the One Male Condom may inspire more individuals to use a condom for anal sex when they might not otherwise—an essential aim is given the increased risk of infection transmission associated with anal sex. It’s also likely, according to the FDA, that this approval would pave the way for comparable treatments to reach the market more quickly in the future.

“The risk of STI transmission during anal intercourse is significantly higher than during vaginal intercourse. The FDA’s authorization of a condom that is specifically indicated, evaluated and labeled for anal intercourse may improve the likelihood of condom use during anal intercourse,” said Courtney Lias, Ph.D., director of the FDA’s Office of GastroRenal, ObGyn, General Hospital, and Urology Devices in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. 


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Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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