Study Indicates That COVID Outpatients Pose Higher Risk of Developing Neurodegenerative Disorders

Study Indicates That COVID Outpatients Pose Higher Risk of Developing Neurodegenerative Disorders
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A new study confirms that we shouldn’t take COVID too lightly, even though humanity has indeed made a lot of progress when it comes to tackling the coronavirus. The research analyzed the health records of more than half of Denmark’s population, and it was led by Dr. Pardis Zarifkar from the Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen.

The scientists’ new work indicates that those outpatients who test positive for COVID have higher chances of dealing with neurodegenerative diseases compared to those who are ‘clean,’ testing negative for the coronavirus, as MedicalExpress.com reveals. Alzheimer’s is also among those neurodegenerative diseases, others being Parkinson’s disease and ischemic stroke.

43,375 COVID-positive people are at significantly higher risk of neurodegenerative diseases

The research found that 43,375 people who were found positive for coronavirus tests had an over three times higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia. This amount of people was taken from a total of 919,731 individuals who tested positive for COVID. That group of over 43,000 people has also shown significantly higher chances of developing other awful conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. 

However, there’s no use starting to freak out yet. In a nutshell, more studies are needed. Here’s what Dr. Pardis Zarifkar said, the leader of the study, as medicalexpress.com quotes:

We found support for an increased risk of being diagnosed with neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular disorders in COVID-19 positive compared to COVID-negative patients, which must be confirmed or refuted by large registry studies in the near future. Reassuringly, apart [from] ischemic stroke, most neurological disorders do not appear to be more frequent after COVID-19 than after influenza or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

Whether we like it or not, the COVID pandemic is still out there looking for its prey. The disease won’s let someone off the hook just because he’s famous, wealthy, or always on the ball.

The new research was presented at the 8th European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Congress.


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Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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