Running a marathon can cause kidney damage

Running a marathon can cause kidney damage
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Running is often considered a good option for doing sports and fighting heart disease and diabetes. However, running long distances, such as during a marathon, could have surprising health consequences. A new study by Yale students found that the physical stress generated by the marathon can cause kidney damage in the short term.

Led by Professor Chirag Parikh, the researchers studied a small group of runners who participated in the Hartford Marathon in 2015. The team collected blood and urine samples before and after the event that stretched over 42 kilometers. They analyzed the various signs of kidney damage, such as serum creatine levels, kidney cells under a microscope, and proteins present in the urine.

It was found that 82% of the riders studied had acute renal failure level 1, a condition by which the kidneys fail to filter toxins from the blood shortly after the stroke. “The kidney responds to the physical stress of the marathon as if it were injured, similar to what happens in hospitalized patients when the kidney is affected by medical and surgical complications,” said Professor Parikh.

The researchers explained that the possible causes of kidney malfunctions, related to the marathon, could be the continuous increase in body temperature, dehydration, or a lower blood circulation in the kidneys, which occur by running Long distances.

While the reported kidney problem disappeared within two days of the marathon, the experience helped raise awareness about the negative results of repeated activities over time, with more risks of problems in hot climates. “We need to explore this more in depth,” Professor Parikh said. Research has shown that there are also changes associated with the marathon in heart functions. ”

The entire study was published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases


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