Researchers Are Worried About New COVID-19 Strain Emerging in New York

Researchers Are Worried About New COVID-19 Strain Emerging in New York
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The SARS-CoV-2 virus tends to mutate in order to survive as long as more and more people get vaccinated. We have to deal with this unpleasant truth, and a new variant of the coronavirus is added to the list. Researchers from Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons are raising the alarm that a new COVID strain emerges in New York, according to an article from New York Post.

The new COVID strain shares some characteristics with the South African variant of the virus that put an entire planet on hold. This means that the New York strain should also be capable of infecting people easier than older variants. As of mid-February, the new strain was found in about 12 percent of coronavirus samples that were collected in New York and surrounding areas.

Beware for B.1.526!

B.1.526 is the name of the new COVID strain that New Yorkers have to deal with. However, there’s also some good news: while analyzing the public databases, the researchers involved in the discovery didn’t find a prevalence of the Brazilian or South African strains of the coronavirus. Dr. Anne-Catrin Uhlemann, an assistant professor in the infectious diseases division at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, declared:

Instead we found high numbers of this home-grown lineage.

With over 66.5 million COVID vaccine doses administered, according to Bloomberg, the US looks like it’s on the right path if we consider the full picture. Worldometers.info informs that the world’s most affected country by the COVID-19 pandemic has surpassed 28.9 million infections and 518,000 deaths.

The COVID numbers had been significantly decreasing in the US for the latest weeks, granting a lot of hope that the country is finally heading towards the end of the ongoing pandemic. However, there’s still a lot more to learn about the New York strain of the coronavirus.


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