Research Finds Connection Between Childhood Obesity And Increased Middle Age Cognitive Decline

Research Finds Connection Between Childhood Obesity And Increased Middle Age Cognitive Decline
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People who had better health indicators as children also scored higher on cognitive ability tests when they were adults, according to the findings of a study that tracked a sample for a period of thirty years and followed participants. A new study that was just released in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport discovered what is believed to be the first significant association between childhood obesity and a larger cognitive decline in middle life. This may also increase the chance of developing dementia.

The link between childhood obesity and cognitive decline

Over the course of thirty years, the survey tracked more than 1200 individuals. In 1985, when all of the subjects were between the ages of seven and fifteen, researchers examined their physical as well as muscular resistance, and also their cardiorespiratory ability, evaluated their waist-to-hip ratio, and assessed their waist circumference. All of the participants in the subsequent round of evaluations ranged in age from 39 to 50 when the studies were conducted between 2017 and 2019. This time, the emphasis was placed on a person’s cognitive abilities, and tests were administered to determine their levels of attention and memory.

The researchers discovered a link, which said that the individuals’ scores on cognitive ability tests when they were children were directly correlated to their scores on the same exams when they were adults. This research joins others that have uncovered apparent correlations between the likelihood of getting dementia in old age and behaviors in early life. These studies were conducted in the United Kingdom.

The authors of the study point out that the survey results demonstrate that treatments and lifestyle modifications in infancy and adolescence can help avoid dementia and cognitive impairment throughout one’s lifetime. According to them, it is crucial to develop tactics that enhance the physical shape and lower levels of childhood obesity. These strategies can lead to gains in cognitive function in middle age, which is why their development is important. Essentially, the findings of the study suggest that preventative measures against future cognitive deterioration may need to be implemented as early as childhood and adolescence in order for the brain to build up an adequate reserve against the onset of these disorders in the old life.


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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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