People Who Are Apparently Healthy Represent One of the Causes of the Rise in COVID Delta Infections

People Who Are Apparently Healthy Represent One of the Causes of the Rise in COVID Delta Infections
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A new study brings an intriguing claim that will surely cause a lot of fuss. A detailed analysis of an outbreak from Guangdong (China) was made, and it resulted that those infected with the Delta strain of the SARS-CoV-2 virus are more likely to spread COVID before even developing any symptoms.

The terrible information is brought by Nature.com. Benjamin Cowling, who is a co-author of the study and an epidemiologist from the University of Hong Kong, said it plainly and firmly, as quoted by Nature.com:

It is just tougher to stop.

The scientists analyzed data belonging to 101 people from Guangdong who were infected with the Delta strain of COVID between May and June 2021. Data from their close contacts were also analyzed.

Symptoms appeared 5.8 days after the infection with the Delta strain

The researchers concluded that, generally, people began to manifest symptoms 5.8 days after getting infected with the Delta variant and 1.8 days after the first viral RNA test came back positive.

The Delta strain of COVID is considered more infectious than other strains. Florida has recently been dealing with one of the worst outbreaks of the coronavirus in the entire nation, as hospitals became overwhelmed.

Delta is currently the dominant strain in the US. According to worldometers.info, the country is dealing with over 100,000 COVID infections per day.


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Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

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