New Study Shows That Epileptic Seizures Significantly Go Down for Children While Applying Cannabis Treatment

New Study Shows That Epileptic Seizures Significantly Go Down for Children While Applying Cannabis Treatment
SHARE

One of the horrible things about epilepsy is that anyone can deal with it. In the case of elders, epileptic seizures often represent the effect of other health issues such as heart disease and stroke. Such seizures start for the first time in old people just as often as it happens in the case of children.

ScienceAert.com speaks about an observational study from the UK upon ten children and published in BMJ Pediatrics Open. The little ones were suffering from intractable forms of epilepsy, and they underwent a medicine based on cannabis. Incredibly, that caused their seizure frequency to drastically fall, according to early results.

An average decrease of 86 percent

The children in question experienced a decrease for their seizure of roughly 86 percent after the given medicine. The treatment consisted of flavonoids, cannabidiols, and terpenes. The research wasn’t placebo-controlled.

The authors of the case series stated:

We are currently in [the] process of analyzing the respective components of each medication in this study which we plan to report on.

Flavonoids are very prevalent in nature, as they can be found in almost all fruits and vegetables. Also, we’re talking about a diverse group of phytonutrients and powerful antioxidants, and they play a huge role when it comes to giving the vivid colors of vegetables and fruits, along with carotenoids.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), roughly 50 million people worldwide have to deal with epilepsy, which means that the condition is one of the most common neurological diseases in the world. Also, the organization reveals that if proper diagnosis and treatment occur, a maximum of 70% of individuals living with epilepsy could continue their lives without dealing with seizures.

The WHO also speaks about the problem of epilepsy in low-income countries. In these places, three-thirds of those who suffer from epilepsy don’t benefit from the treatment they need.


SHARE
Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.