New Monkeypox Outbreaks Might Suggest Changes of the Virus

New Monkeypox Outbreaks Might Suggest Changes of the Virus
SHARE

New monkeypox outbreaks are causing a lot of concerns among medical experts. There’s no fooling around when it comes to such a virus, although it spreads significantly harder compared to COVID. Monkeypox can pass from one person to another through contact with bodily fluids.

If you experience symptoms such as muscle aches, fever, headaches, or exhaustion, it could mean the debut of monkeypox in your body. That means that you should seek medical attendance ASAP!

Canada deals with new monkeypox outbreaks

According to cbc.ca, dozens of people from Canada became susceptible to being infected with monkeypox. Five individuals of this group have already been confirmed to have the virus in the Quebec province.

The same publication tells us that the increase in monkeypox cases across the world could mean that the behavior of the virus itself is going through some changes.

Yesterday, May 20, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced that there are about 80 confirmed monkeypox cases worldwide. But the bad news is not over, as the same Government agency says that there are other 50 cases under investigation. 

The monkeypox virus was first discovered back in the ’50s in laboratory monkeys, according to Nature. Therefore, it’s not a newly discovered virus such as COVID since it’s been around for a few decades.

But here’s what Jason Kindrachuk, who’s an assistant professor of viral pathogenesis at the University of Manitoba, had to say as cbc.ca quotes:

The global spread is concerning. That’s not something that we are particularly used to with monkeypox, 

What we’re seeing right now is unprecedented. We have multiple geographic locations across the globe that are reporting cases … What is the epidemiological link between these cases and is there anything that is related back to changes within the virus?

Monkeypox can spread as two main strains, and one of them can cause a mortality rate of up to 10 percent – that’s the Congo strain. The other strain is the West African, which can only cause a mortality rate of 1 percent. Luckily enough, it appears that the less severe strain is the one currently circulating across the world. 

Researchers from various parts of the world are sequencing genomes in order to try to determine if the West African strain of monkeypox has distinct genetic mutations or not.


SHARE
Cristian Antonescu

Even since he was a child, Cristian was staring curiously at the stars, wondering about the Universe and our place in it. Today he's seeing his dream come true by writing about the latest news in astronomy. Cristian is also glad to be covering health and other science topics, having significant experience in writing about such fields.

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.