Japanese Doctors Conducted A Stem Cells Transplant Into The Brain of a Parkinson’s Disease Patient

Japanese Doctors Conducted A Stem Cells Transplant Into The Brain of a Parkinson’s Disease Patient
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Japanese doctors have transplanted stem cells into the brain of a patient with Parkinson’s disease to recreate neurons. That might be an operation that could make a difference in the Parkinson’s disease treatments.

The Parkinson’s disease is affecting ten million people worldwide, and it doesn’t have a reliable treatment, at the moment. All the therapies against this neurodegenerative disease are only targeting the amelioration of the symptoms. However, the Japanese doctors managed to use stem cells transplant into the brain of a patient with Parkinson’s disease to recreate neurons.

On Friday, November 9th, the researchers announced that they had successfully transplanted iPS stem cells into a patient’s brain. The benefits of stem cells have long been studied, and this discovery only confirms that one day, even the most severe diseases will be combated.

Stem cells transplant represents a breakthrough for Parkinson’s disease treatment research

The team of Japanese doctors successfully transplanted rejuvenated iPS stem cells into the brain of a person affected by Parkinson’s disease, according to the statements the researchers released on November 9th. Stem cells can take any shape they want, and thus the scientists relied on them to recreate neurons.

That’s excellent news since Parkinson’s affects the neurons, so creating new neural cells could be beneficial in reducing the disease’s symptoms. Japanese doctors have successfully implanted 2.5 million stem cells in the patient’s left hemisphere. Even though the implementation was a success, the researchers at Kyoto University are still waiting for the results. We will, therefore, have to wait and see if a stem cells transplant would indeed produce new neural cells in the brain of patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s disease causes motor disorders with tremors and difficulties during movement. With 10 million people affected worldwide, finding a cure and stopping the disease’s evolution is a priority for scientists.


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