Infections From COVID-19 Can Sometimes Be Made Worse By A Protein Called CD47

Infections From COVID-19 Can Sometimes Be Made Worse By A Protein Called CD47
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Scientists suggest that the intensity of COVID the virus in an individual is determined by one particular protein. People with greater amounts of CD47 protein on the surface of infected cells appear to be blocking the viral immune system. Researchers suggest that a key component related to severe COVID-19 might have been found. This is an enormous step towards fighting this disease, and we should expect additional development in treatment design soon.

The problem is the protein CD47 communicates that the virus is not damaging to the immune system, which, if done, cannot be circumvented by the immune function. The protein is intended to indicate to the immune system that healthy cells are not attacked. Researchers found that more of that protein emerges on the surface when the virus infects human cells.

This prevents danger from being identified by the immune system, therefore enabling the virus to reproduce, generate more symptoms, and ultimately kill the person. Risk variables such as age and diabetes are linked to CD47; those with these issues have more of such protein. A significant cause is high blood pressure, which is similarly a risk factor for Coronavirus infections, with large quantities of CD47.

The current COVID-19 pandemic is caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The majority of infections with SARS-CoV-2 are moderate or asymptomatic. Unfortunately, a few infected people acquire serious, life-threatening diseases produced by an unregulated immune response that leads to hyperinflammation. Factors that prevent people from being seriously diseased, however, often remain unclear, according to the study.

“These additional insights into the disease processes underlying COVID-19 may help us to design better therapies, as well as appreciation for the importance of the breadth of research being conducted. Through this avenue, we have achieved a major breakthrough and exemplified that the fight against the disease continues,” explained Professor Jindrich Cinatl.


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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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