Higher Risk For Lyme Disease Cases In Most Parts Of Cape Breton

Higher Risk For Lyme Disease Cases In Most Parts Of Cape Breton
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Lyme disease remains an issue in Cape Breton, and it appears that most parts of it have a high risk. The latest provincial tick maps confirm this, marking the Lyme disease estimated risk areas.

“It’s been alarming to us because there’s a pile of different variables as to why that could happen,” explained Jeff McNeil, the president of the Port Morien Wildlife Association. McNeil also believes that people are vulnerable while out in wooded areas or long grass.

“We actually think about it on a daily basis when we’re out doing projects — even fishing projects when we’re out with youth. They’ve taken a stronghold, more or less, in the area,” he added. McNeil is a hunter, as well as an angler, so he has to deal with this issue first hand. “Any time you’re sending your dog through longer-style grass, there’s a chance that they could pick something up, or as they’re going out and doing their retrieves.

Lyme Disease risks increase in most parts of Cape Breton

People are reminded once again to take all the precautions. If you spend a day out in the woods, it is important to check yourself afterward and make sure that there are no ticks on your skin or clothes.

The first Lyme disease cases were reported in 2002, and they have become more frequent ever since. The province was declared a risk area for Lyme by the Health Department back in 2017. This continues to be accurate, as the latest map confirms that there are only three counties in the lower risk category: Vitoria, Richmond, and Inverness. Meanwhile, Guysborough County is a moderate risk area. “We try to kind of be diligent and keep an eye on that. I guess it becomes part of the routine,” concluded McNeil.


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