Dementia Risks Decrease For Those Who Receive Mental Stimulation At Their Job

Dementia Risks Decrease For Those Who Receive Mental Stimulation At Their Job
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The researchers suggest that how mentally stimulating a job is could play an important role in how well it helps to prevent dementia. Old age is ever looming large with the onset of dementia. It has long been known that mentally stimulating jobs retain cognitive function better than sedentary jobs. This study also found that job satisfaction and mental health were improved among workers who took part in mentally stimulating activities at work. The more you live, work and interact with creative individuals, the greater your chance of having excellent mental health and a rewarding job.

According to scientists, this happens because the stimulation of the brain is connected to brain cells processes such as synaptogenesis or axogenesis because it decreases the level of proteins that prevent these connections. With the help of cognitive stimulation, dementia can be delayed or even prevented. Nevertheless, it appears that mental stimulation that takes place during leisure time does not have a significant impact on the risk of dementia. On the other hand, stimulating the brain at work has long-lasting effects, and it proves to be more efficient.

The team who researched the effects of mental stimulation at the job looked at connections between workplace factors and various diseases. “The findings that cognitive stimulation is associated with lower levels of plasma proteins that potentially inhibit axonogenesis and synaptogenesis and increase the risk of dementia might provide clues to underlying biological mechanisms,” revealed the study.

The study participants were followed for 17 years to discover whether dementia was developed, and it was discovered that jobs actively stimulating the brain through high demands and job control were associated with a lower risk of dementia. To reach this conclusion, researchers also adjusted their findings to other factors such as lifestyle, age, sex or other diseases. As this study was observational, researchers do not exclude the possibility that other factors could have played a significant role as well.


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Katherine Baldwin

Katherine is just getting her start as a journalist. She attended a technical school while still in high school where she learned a variety of skills, from photography to nutrition. Her enthusiasm for both natural and human sciences is real so she particularly enjoys covering topics on medicine and the environment.

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