COVID-19 Survivors At Increased Risk Of Renal Impairment, As Per The Study

COVID-19 Survivors At Increased Risk Of Renal Impairment, As Per The Study
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A paper submitted in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology this week shows that people who have recovered from COVID-19 are more prone to losing function in kidneys because of injury or illness in that spot. Survivors with moderate symptoms of the virus are also included in the findings of the study.

Researchers also said that 510,000 people who suffered Coronavirus might suffer renal damage or illness amongst the 38 million individuals who have been positively screened with Covid since the pandemic started.

The scientists from the Washington School of Medicine determined that the incidence of severe kidney injury among virus long-haulers is greater but also that there is a danger to kidney outcomes in the recovery period. As per the published scientific paper, kidney failure and illness are usually pain-free.

“Our findings emphasize the critical importance of paying attention to kidney function and disease in caring for patients who have had COVID-19,” explained senior research author Ziyad Al-Aly, who is an assistant professor of medicine at Washington University.

Throughout the research, most persons chosen as volunteers for the investigation were males in the sixties or above, and participants who were hospitalized after being infected with COVID-19 had the greatest chance of irreversible damage to their kidneys. 

Since the pandemic started, experts’ findings show that patients with Coronavirus are frequently affected by renal disorders and not only by lung issues which seem to be characteristic of the disease. Kidneys carry wastes from the body and contain many chemicals used in making protein. Without them, many of our body’s functions could be impaired. Kidney diseases develop when the disease may not be controlled by the patient’s liver but by an infection. Symptoms of impaired kidney function may include feeling tired, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and changes in behavior. Several viral and bacterial infections can also affect a person’s ability to keep their vital functions in check.


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Asheley Rice

I am a pop culture and social media expert. Aside from writing about the latest news health, I also enjoy pop culture and Yoga. I have BA in American Cultural Studies and currently enrolled in a Mass-Media MA program. I like to spend my spring breaks volunteering overseas.

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