COVID-19 Study: New Potential Risks Revealed For Pregnant Women

COVID-19 Study: New Potential Risks Revealed For Pregnant Women
SHARE

Experts are currently learning more details about what pregnant women could be experiencing if they are infected with the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

It’s been revealed that pregnant and recently pregnant women who are diagnosed with the disease in the hospital appear to be less likely to have symptoms of fever and muscle pain but it’s more likely that they are admitted to the intensive care unit, according to the latest data coming from a new paper published in the BMJ medical journal this week.

Increased risks for pregnant women 

It’s been also revealed that the study also found that pregnant women with Covid-19 are looking at an increased risk of delivering preterm, but preterm birth rates were not high.
“We found that one in 10 pregnant or recently pregnant women who are attending or admitted to hospital for any reason are diagnosed as having suspected or confirmed Covid-19, although the rates vary,” experts revealed in the paper.

It’s also important to mention the fact that experts reviewed 77 studies on the disease in pregnant and recently pregnant women.

“The Covid-19 related symptoms of fever and myalgia (muscle ache) manifest less often in pregnant and recently pregnant women than in nonpregnant women of reproductive age,” the researchers wrote, as cited by CNN
They continued and explained that “Pregnant or recently pregnant women with Covid-19 seem to be at increased risk of requiring admission to an intensive care unit or invasive ventilation.”

Another important issue that has been addressed is the fact that older women, women who are heavier, and the ones with underlying conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease, and other chronic conditions could have a higher risk of severe disease. 

“Reviews such as this can only be as good as the studies they summarize and it is important to note that a high proportion of the included studies have a substantial risk of bias,” Dr. Marian Knight stated. 


SHARE

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.