Coronavirus Breakthrough: New Drug Shows Massive Promise

Coronavirus Breakthrough: New Drug Shows Massive Promise
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Coronavirus has been making headlines for more than a year now and things don’t seem to be getting back to normal too soon.

As you probably know by now, it’s been just reported that there are some pretty devastating effects that Covid survivors will be keeping with them for a while after the disease has passed.

According to the latest reports coming from CNBC, it seems that one in three Covid-19 survivors has suffered a neurological or psychiatric disorder within six months of infection with the virus. 

You should check out more data about the issue in our previous article.

Also, make sure to learn about the fact that it’s been just revealed that a top European Medicines Agency (EMA) official said in an interview published Tuesday that there is a link between the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine and blood clots.

New drug shows promising results 

It’s been revealed that experts are reporting progress in their search for drugs that could help us get back to normality.

More specifically, they are working to find ways to tamp down the overwhelming immune reaction that can kill a patient who suffers from Covid-19.

NPR.org notes that such reactions are triggered by the coronavirus infections and they can veer out of control in some people. It’s been revealed that this reaction kills some of the patients and not the disease itself.

The same online publication notes that back in 2020, doctors recognized that a cheap and readily available steroid drug called dexamethasone can often rein in this overreaction, which is a form of inflammation. In fact, it’s the only COVID-19 drug so far that clearly saves lives.

“Dexamethasone is a really powerful anti-inflammatory,” says Dr Rajesh Gandhi, an infectious disease doctor at Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital, but, “there are still people who need more.”

Check out more about the issue in the original article. 


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