CDC Modifies Definition Of ‘Vaccine’ – Should We Be Skeptical?

CDC Modifies Definition Of ‘Vaccine’ – Should We Be Skeptical?
SHARE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention site made some notable changes to the vaccine definition. To be more precise, the definition changed from “the act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease” to “the act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce protection to a specific disease.”

More than that, when looking at how the vaccine is defined, the CDC modified that as well. The current definition reads“a preparation that is used to stimulate the body’s immune response against diseases,” while previously it read “a product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease.”

Skeptics were quick to jump to conclusions. Several have argued that these modifications were an effort by the CDC to disguise that COVID-19 vaccinations do not work fully in combating COVID-19 infection.

A spokesperson of the CDC however offered a prompt response, explaining that the previous definition could be “interpreted to mean that vaccines were 100% effective, which has never been the case for any vaccine, so the current definition is more transparent, and also describes the ways in which vaccines can be administered.”

The misunderstanding continues that Coronavirus vaccinations have been developed to suppress infections completely, making people think the vaccines are not efficient when learning about breakthrough infections for those who have received the immunization.

Credit: Pixabay.com, fernando zhiminaicela
Credit: Pixabay.com, fernando zhiminaicela

Nonetheless, even with more infectious strains, like the delta form, COVID-19 vaccination does precisely what it was meant to do, which is to avoid serious disease forms which would lead to hospitalization or death.

Although statistics show COVID-19 vaccinations in numerous epidemic circumstances avert infections, the fact that outbreak illnesses occurred suggests no failure. Therefore, the new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of vaccines should not be a reason to worry.


SHARE
Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

Share this post

One thought on “CDC Modifies Definition Of ‘Vaccine’ – Should We Be Skeptical?

  1. a substance used to stimulate the production of antibodies and provide immunity against one or several diseases, prepared from the causative agent of a disease, its products, or a synthetic substitute, treated to act as an antigen without inducing the disease.
    “every year the flu vaccine is modified to deal with new strains of the virus”

    You can’t change the definition of a word to fit your needs CDC.

    Reply

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.