Acrylamide to be Removed from Crisps and Biscuits Due to Cancer Fears

Acrylamide to be Removed from Crisps and Biscuits Due to Cancer Fears
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Whether you call them crisps and biscuits like British people or chips and cookies like Americans, one thing is for sure: golden treats are about to become paler.

Food manufacturers will have to reduce the levels of acrylamide, the chemical component in charge of giving the golden color to all-out sweet and salty treats due to cancer fears.

 

The Telegraph reports that Mark & Spencer (M&S) snacks have high levels of acrylamide. According to the journal, it is not the only brand to contain such high levels. The substance is formed when potatoes and grains are baked above 120C. The chemical component might be carcinogenic and it can be found also in bread and baby food. The World Health Organization has identified acrylamide as cancer risk.

Snack manufacturers have to reduce the amount of chemicals

According to the Food Standards Agency’s testing, the brand M&S has biscuits which contain high levels of the chemical. Even restaurants and pubs have to pay attention not to use this kind of products.

The reduced use of the chemical will also make crisps and biscuits look pale. According to Dr. Lisa Ackerley from the British Hospitality Association, many snack brands are already making progress in using less of the chemical. She says that it is visible just by comparing the color of today’s snacks.

Learn to reduce cancer risk due to this exposure

The Food Standards Agency advises people to follow simple steps in order to consume less acrylamide.

One step is to toast your bread only until it reaches a light brown color. Also, it is important to follow cooking instructions on food packaging.

A simple step is to make sure you are not cooking your food for too long and at very high-temperatures.


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