Quitting Antidepressants Can Be Dangerous According To New Study

Quitting Antidepressants Can Be Dangerous According To New Study
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Abrupt drug discontinuation in treatment-resistant depression is associated with high relapse rates, according to a new study. Among patients with chronic depression who tried to quit taking antidepressant medication, over half relapsed into depression by the end of a year, compared to those who did not try to quit, according to a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial released Wednesday.

I think we can be very cheered by the findings. This is really good evidence to support a patient’s own decisions — in discussion with their doctor or other prescriber — about whether they should continue antidepressants or not. Both courses of action are reasonable,” explained co-author Dr. Tony Kendrick.
 
In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that patients who discontinued antidepressant therapy were often severely depressed. Although not everyone will have the same positive results, a small percentage of people may be able to stop their antidepressant relapse.
“In my own practice, if the patient has a first episode of depression, and particularly if it was triggered by a life event — death of a loved one, failed business — then I try my best to get patients into remission (and) then I treat for a minimum of six months after they achieve remission,” explained Dr. JeffreyJackson.
Antidepressants are a class of drugs used to treat the major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. They are also sometimes prescribed for anxiety disorders. Major depressive disorder (also called clinical depression) is a mental illness that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities, along with a change in appetite, sleeping patterns, and energy levels. The major depressive disorder often first develops during adolescence or early adulthood. Depression is a very serious condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Unfortunately, many people aren’t aware of the symptoms, leading to a delay in seeking treatment.

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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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