Japanese Scientists Develop Vaccine that Could End SARS-related pandemics

Japanese Scientists Develop Vaccine that Could End SARS-related pandemics
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The Covid-19 pandemic has been ongoing for the past 20 months, and the world is waiting for it to end. Several Covid-19 vaccines have been administered worldwide, and health providers are using several drugs to treat severe and mild Covid-19 infections. In the hopes of stopping the virus and its many strains once and for all, Japanese scientists developed a new Covid-19 vaccine. The findings were published in the Journal of Experimental Magazine, and the future looks promising. 

 

Many SARS-related coronaviruses have the potential to cause pandemics

Researchers believe that a critical factor in understanding which coronaviruses have the potential to start a pandemic is by studying how these viruses emerge in animals and how they jump to humans. The next step is to create a next-generation vaccine, such as the one from the study, that can train antibodies to recognize the core of the different types of coronaviruses and prevent it from infecting the human body. 

Several viruses have spread from animals to humans, such as MERS, bird flu, Nipah virus, swine flu, Ebola, and the SARS-CoV-2 virus. 

Credit: Unsplash

A zoonotic coronavirus can jump from animals to humans due to wildlife exploitations, aggressive farming, and manipulating meat products without proper safety measures. As humans destroy animals’ natural habitats, more viruses could potentially threaten our health. 

 

What we know about the ground-breaking vaccine

The study used genetic engineering to modify the famous spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. By modifying the spike protein, the virus cannot cause infection in humans. The process would consist of covering the virus’ head with extra sugar molecules. The vaccine has been tested on mice, and the latter developed robust antibodies against the virus. The vaccine blocked the SARS-CoV-2 virus and the SARS-CoV-1 virus, as well as three other coronaviruses. The key action is for antibodies to manage to identify the coronavirus’s core and prevent it from infecting human cells. 

Once researchers conduct similar studies and create a next-generation vaccine against several coronaviruses, the world could be a safer place.


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Jeffrey Olmsted

Jeffrey likes to write about health and fitness topics, being a champion fitness instructor in the past.

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