Covid 19 Vaccines And Menstrual Cycle Changes – Here’s What You Need To Know

Covid 19 Vaccines And Menstrual Cycle Changes – Here’s What You Need To Know
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There has been a lot of debate about the effects that covid 19 vaccines have on menstrual cycles, and now, The Wall Street Journal is addressing the issue. Here’s what you need to know about the subject.

The WSJ article begins by noting the following:

“Since widespread immunization against Covid-19 began last year, doctors and medical researchers have been fielding reports of painful cramps, delayed periods and other changes in menstrual cycles among some who got the vaccines.”

Small changes in the menstrual cycle post-vaccine 

The notes continue and reveal that now research confirms that the shots can affect menstrual cycles. The article also mentions one recent study linking vaccination to a slight increase in menstrual-cycle length.

Source: pixabay.com

“It’s reassuring that it’s small,” Alison Edelman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Oregon Health & Science University and one of the researchers who conducted the study, said of vaccines’ effect on menstrual cycles.

She continued and said the following:

“It’s also validating to individuals who experienced it.”

We suggest that you check out the original article in order to learn more details about the issue. The news is important, just like many others that came to kill the myths claiming that covid vaccines have no such side effects. 

Coronavirus in the news 

The news worldwide has been flooded with coronavirus-related issues for more than two years. Most headlines involve vaccines, treatments, and all kinds of terrifying data, more or less accurate or legit.

Few publications have been addressing the importance of a healthy lifestyle during this nightmare which will probably turn out to be the harshest period of our lifetimes. 

The Times of Israel notes that scientists revealed the fact that they have gathered the most convincing evidence to date saying that increased vitamin D levels can help COVID-19 patients reduce the risk of serious illness or death.


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Rada Mateescu

Passionate about subjects from the science and health-related areas, Rada has been blogging for about ten years and at Health Thoroughfare, she's covering the latest news on these niches.

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